Finding safe places

The news a couple days ago had a tragic story about an extended family who apparently got caught in the middle of a war between drug cartels in a rather remote area of Mexico. They were traveling in three SUVs on their way to a wedding–but instead, they are now planning funerals for three women and six children. Several other children survived and were flown to hospitals in the United States for treatment.

The family members were dual citizens of Mexico and the United States and had lived in the area for decades. They are part of a fundamentalist Mormon group that had had issues with drug cartels in the past–but this was like nothing they had experienced.

There has been an outpouring of anger and sympathy over the incident. Anger that innocent women and children could be gunned down like this…sympathy for the family members left behind and for the children injured.

It’s understandable–and appropriate to want to ensure that this family and the surviving children find safe places and healing.

However…what about the families and children who are not United States citizens who live in similar circumstances? Do they not also deserve similar concern? empathy for their desires to find safe places and healing?

Or do we only do that for families with white skin? and United States citizenship?

I am aware that sounds harsh. But I cannot help but wonder. Yes, I know there are children needing help in the United States…and I know we need to take a good luck at our immigration policies.

But when I look at the families–and their children–who are living in tent cities…or whose children have been separated from them and put in cages in detention centers or, even worse, given to potential adoptive parents without their biological parents’ consent or knowledge…can we not have empathy for them?

Many of them are fleeing situations that are every bit as bad as this American family experienced. They fear for their children…and hope for a better future.

Do they not also deserve safe places? Even if it’s not in this country, can we not help create safe places in their homelands? or at the last, treat them with dignity while they are waiting to hear about their future?

In my theology, every human being is created in the image of God. And my scriptures tell me that the way we treat other human beings is the way we treat Jesus, whom I worship as God-in-the-flesh.

This same Jesus was a refugee with his family as a baby, fleeing genocide, according to the Bible. He deserved–and found–a safe place.

So do all people.

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