Called to accountability

One of the most challenging lessons we as parents try to teach our children is the lesson of accountability…to help them understand that words and actions have consequences–and that if they are going to use certain words or take certain actions, they have to take responsibility for what happens.

It’s not an easy lesson, and some never learn it. Sometimes because the parents never learned it themselves. Sometimes because the parents think they are loving their children by shielding them from taking responsibility–or because they want to “fix” everything for their children. Sometimes there are mental or physical health issues that play into the whole situation.

But most of us understand–at least partially–what it means to be accountable.

If we have a job, there are certain things expected of us. If we choose not to meet those expectations, then there are consequences. We are accountable for our decisions.

It’s not easy to hold each other accountable. It’s especially difficult when we deal with that in the political realm. We each have strong feelings about the party and individuals we choose to support–and when someone else raises questions about their actions / policies / words, we tend to jump to the defense of the party and/or individual and believe that those we support are under attack.

But what if we were¬†all able to stop and take a deep breath before responding? What if we were able to recognize that we all have the responsibility of being accountable for our actions and words–and appreciate someone else challenging us to consider the results of those actions and words?

What if we believed that it really does take a village? because each of us has a different perspective on life issues and we need all those perspectives to be able to discern the best way forward?

Accountability doesn’t mean that we ignore things we disagree with. It sometimes means making difficult decisions to challenge what someone else is saying or doing. Not the individual themselves, but their actions and words…hopefully helping them (and all of us) understand the cost of those words and actions.

Calling someone to accountability isn’t a personal attack. It isn’t hatred. It isn’t a knee jerk reaction to something someone disagrees with. It’s a responsibility all of us have–especially in our democracy.

If we become afraid to challenge…afraid to hold our political leaders (and ourselves!) accountable for words and actions…believing that those challenges are always attacks…then we are traveling down a road that may very well lead to the end of democracy.

Democracy must be built through open societies that share information. When there is information, there is enlightenment. When there is debate, there are solutions. When there is no sharing of power, no rule of law, no accountability, there is abuse, corruption, subjugation and indignation.-  Atifete Jahjaga